Turquoise for December

Turquoise is found in many places across the globe and offers a wide range of naturally occurring colours, caused by a differing metal content in the rock where it has been formed. Typically found in higher elevations, in arid plains or deserts, and most commonly found rather shallow in the earth’s crust generally no deeper than 35 meters. This close proximity to the surface combined with its tantalising colour makes it easy to see why this was one of the first stones ever to be used in jewellery

...

"It is believed that turquoise was first found and mined thousands of years ago in Persia (as far back as 5000BC!)"

...
Our ancestors used turquoise for many different reasons and held various beliefs regarding its origins and its powers. It has been used as currency, offerings, religious ceremonies, burial rites, sacred medicines, talismans, charms and more. In the 15th century, for example, physicians of the day would actually prescribe turquoise to their patients for healing purposes. Turquoise is a stone of mystery and wonder and it's time we explore a few stories from this ancient gemstone:
 
Model wearing turquoise and silver bohemian style bracelet and rings
Persians had a saying regarding how to enjoy good luck and steer clear of evil, one must see the reflection of a new moon either on the face of a friend, a copy of the Koran, or upon a piece of raw turquoise! This has lead to the belief that it is highly beneficial to wear turquoise on the eve of the new moon.
...
Turquoise is known for the ability to not only predict danger but to actually defend the bearer as well! Native Americans commonly wore turquoise and believed that if ever they looked down and saw their turquoise ring cracked, they would say “The stone took it” meaning the stone had intercepted an imminent blow from the cosmos that was meant for them, protecting them from harm. Others believed that a break in the stone was an omen, a warning of forthcoming danger, and to keep a wary eye open at all times. They also believed that a piece of turquoise attached to their horse's bridal would defend the animal from any nasty falls, further showcasing the belief that turquoise is a protector
...
Apaches believed that one would find not gold, but turquoise at the end of the rainbow! Legend tells us that if a man can get to the end of a rainbow directly after the storm and dig in the damp earth, a treasure of turquoise would surely be found. Hunters attached a piece of turquoise to their bow, which was thought to increase the accuracy of the arrow’s strike. If an Apache shaman didn’t have a piece of turquoise in his or her collection, they would not be recognised by the tribe, thus illustrating the importance of the stone.
Model wearing bohemian style turquoise jewellery by the beach

"Navajos believed that Turquoise was a piece of the sky fallen to Earth"  

In New Mexico and Arizona, tribes were recorded using turquoise in their rain ceremonies. A ritual that often culminated in one of the shamans throwing a piece of raw turquoise into a rushing river as an offering to the gods.
Then when the rains came they would dance and rejoice crying tears of joy, which they believed would mix with the rain and seep into the earth to create more turquoise
Model wears ocean friendly turquoise jewellery in a boho style.
Turquoise is a porous stone and it can react to its surrounding environment by changing colour. This colour changing ability is why many shamans would use this is divination rituals assuming the colour changes to be a prophecy of some kind. This has also given rise to many myths about what the change in colour signifies. Largely the consensus across cultural lines has been that a change in the colour of a piece of turquoise jewellery can signify an oncoming illness or an oncoming life event. 
...
What we know now is this; turquoise is highly sensitive. And what we can learn from this is how to treat our turquoise - with love and respect.  Our ancestors had many stories to tell about this beautiful gemstone, stories that will continue to be told for generations to come. By wearing and loving turquoise jewellery you are a part of this history and you look fabulous!
...
...
*Care instructions:
Best kept away from all solvents, perfumes, chemicals, and prolonged exposure to the sun. Store your turquoise separately from your other jewels to minimise scratching, and avoid storing in an airtight container as this can also affect the colouring of the stone.
...

Shop the look from our Turquoise Favourites this December: